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© 2019 University of Maryland School of Social Work

Featured Articles

This book is a product of the first research project regarding the historical formation and evolution of EAPA-SA conducted by Prof L. S. Terblanche of the University of Pretoria on behalf of EAPA-SA. While many publications have been written about EAPA-SA, this book pays particular attention to the undocumented history about EAP in South Africa. It gives EAPA-SA Board and its members an unprecedented opportunity to tell their story. Moving towards the 20th Anniversary of our foundation, the need increases to order and enhance our identity, historical and current, making it available to members who wish to improve their knowledge of our Association, its roots, its initiatives, its projects, and its collaborations with stakeholders both locally and internationally. This book has been conceived as a complete work tool, rich in information and references. One of the aims of this book was to open up and make available in a user- friendly way, archival material relating to the historical formation and evolution of EAP in South Africa. By doing this we hoped to ensure that the Association histories do not remain in unseen boxes kept in the storage room, but are made more easily accessible to the members of the profession and reading public in an organised and structured manner. You will find in this book, achievements, dedication, struggles, disappointments, courage and perseverance of such great men and women who volunteered their service and time to the Association for no gain beyond their personal interest. This book has been arranged in seven chapters and in chapter with interesting and exciting information about the life journey of our Association. (From the Preface by Tinyiko Godfrey Chabalala)

The authors of this article have been working to develop and issue the first National Guidelines for Workplace Suicide Prevention. The guidelines and recommendations are presented.

We are in the grips of an opioid epidemic. You only need to peek under the surface to see that the pain giving rise to addiction is both psychological and societal. National studies show increases in suicide rates, alcoholism, depression, sleep, fatigue and stress. Now add in the rise of stress-related disorders, positive drug-test rates and social polarization, and it's clear the effect on worker health and productivity is serious.

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